Balearic Islands Yacht Charter Itinerary

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Blessed with nearly year-round sunshine, the Balearic Islands are an ideal yacht charter destination. Their warmest months are from May to October, with temperatures climbing into the mid-80s (or mid-30s in Celsius) in July and August. As such, it’s an ideal summer vacation spot—popular for families and couples alike. With a yacht as your base of operations, you can traverse the Balearic Sea from port to port or around the island of Mallorca at your leisure, taking in the best of this picturesque Mediterranean archipelago.

Without fail, a Balearic Islands luxury yacht charter will continuously astonish you with its dazzling beaches, exciting leisure activities, and world-class dining. It’s plain to see why the Balearics have become one of the hottest yacht charter locales on the planet. As you consider it as a destination, have a look at our sample itinerary for a 7-day charter. However, please note that if you are on a fast motor yacht or are planning a trip longer than 7 days, you can also add Menorca or Ibiza/Formentera to your itinerary.

 

 

First Day: Port Alcudia

Port d'Alcudia. Photo by @egorka_foreve. Used with permission.

A popular resort town on the northeastern side of Mallorca, you’ll start your Balearic Islands yacht charter itinerary in Port d’Alcúdia. One of Mallorca’s largest ports, people from all walks of life come here looking for an enjoyable beach holiday. Aside from having the designation as a Blue Flag beach for its beauty and sustainability, Playa de Alcudia also has something for everyone to enjoy, whether you’re interested in watersports or lounging under an umbrella all day.


Kids will love the nearby Hidropark, where they can swim in pools, ride waterslides, and play mini golf. Or, for the grownups, nearby Golf Alcanada is a gorgeous 18-hole course with a view of the bay, a clubhouse in a 400-year-old Mallorcan mansion, and a multilingual PGA golf school. For a bit of culture with your relaxation, you can also head inland to the Medieval village of Alcúdia with its Roman, Phoenician and Arab influenced architecture.

 

Second Day: Port Alcudia to Cala Millor - 27 nautical miles

  • Approximate Travel Time on a 12 Knot Motor Sailers, Gullets or (slow) Motor Yachts: 2 hr 15 min
  • Approximate Travel Time on a 20 Knot (fast) Motor Yacht: 1 hr 30 min

 

Cala Millor. Photo by Dirk VorderstraBe. CC BY-2.0.

Cala Millor’s biggest attraction is its wide, sandy, Blue Flag beach. With shallow, clear waters, it’s a good choice for families looking to unwind. As a popular resort town, you’ll find lounge chairs, showers, and watersport rentals all along the coast. Learn to windsurf or build sand castles with the kids. There’s even a paved promenade full of souvenir shops, cafes, and bars, allowing you to conveniently move back and forth between the beach, shopping, and eating. Just south of the beach, a part of the coast has been designated as a nature reserve where you’ll also find the watchtower fort, Castel d’Amer. Enjoy a bite to eat or a drink here while admiring the colorful, blue macaw that lives there or the ranch full of horses.

 

Third Day: Cala Millor to Port de Manacor (Porto Cristo) - 4 nautical miles

  • Approximate Travel Time on a 12 Knot Motor Sailers, Gullets or (slow) Motor Yachts: 30 min
  • Approximate Travel Time on a 20 Knot (fast) Motor Yacht: 15 min

 

Porto Cristo. Photo by @louiisaana. Used with permission.

You’ll find many attractions around Porto Cristo including the Cuevas del Drach or ‘dragon caves,’ a unique experience not to be missed. Tour the caves by foot and then enjoy a boat trip across one of the largest underground lakes in the world (Lake Martel), followed by a violin concert on the water. Porto Cristo’s natural rock formations make it a popular stop for cave and scuba divers, but you’ll also find activities like hiking, biking, snorkeling, and kayaking. However, the town itself warrants exploration too, as it’s a former Roman port with history dating back 4000 years. Food plays an important part in the lives of Mallorcans and various food festivals take place in Porto Cristo during the summer. If the performing arts are of interest too, Manacor has a theatre festival from that runs from September-November.

 

Fourth Day: Port de Manacor (Porto Cristo) to Caló des Moro  - 17 nautical miles

  • Approximate Travel Time on a 12 Knot Motor Sailers, Gullets or (slow) Motor Yachts: 1 hr 30 min
  • Approximate Travel Time on a 20 Knot (fast) Motor Yacht: 1 hr

 

Calo des Moro. Photo by @mikesintillate. Used with permission.

Continue down to the southern tip of the island to Calo des Moro—a slice of paradise. Once one of the best kept secrets in Mallorca, now this small, enclosed beach has become a popular holiday spot during the summer months. Surrounded by steep cliffs, greenery, and the far reaches of the Mediterranean Sea’s turquoise waters, Calo des Moro’s impressive beauty will wow you. While the beach is difficult to access by land, you’ll have no trouble anchoring here on your yacht for the day. Swim and snorkel to your heart’s content, but you’ll have to sunbathe from the yacht when the beach gets crowded. Because of its remote location, don’t expect any facilities while at Calo des Moro, nor places to eat or drink. Its best to have your onboard chef (if you book one) prepare something for the day or stock up beforehand in Porto Cristo.

 

Fifth Day: Caló des Moro to Cabrera Island - 14 nautical miles

  • Approximate Travel Time on a 12 Knot Motor Sailers, Gullets or (slow) Motor Yachts: 1 hr 15 min
  • Approximate Travel Time on a 20 Knot (fast) Motor Yacht: 45 min

 

Cabrera Island. Photo by Calvin SmithCC BY-2.0.

Take a day to completely relax and enjoy your surroundings onboard as you sail south to the national park on Cabrera Island. There you’ll find 39 sq. miles of untouched beauty with no real human population to speak of. However, you will find a variety of birds and lizards on the island, in addition to the occasional visitation by marine life like dolphins, orcas, and sea turtles. There’s also a 14th-Century castle overlooking the harbor plus a visitor’s center and a small gift shop. Other activities include hiking amongst the hills or swimming off the yacht. Visiting the park is the perfect opportunity to enjoy a picnic lunch in relative isolation, as its remote location doesn’t attract a large amount of regular visitors.

 

Sixth Day: Cabrera Island to Portals Vells - 28 nautical miles

  • Approximate Travel Time on a 12 Knot Motor Sailers, Gullets or (slow) Motor Yachts: 2 hr 30 min
  • Approximate Travel Time on a 20 Knot (fast) Motor Yacht: 1 hr 30 min

 

Portals Vells. Photo by @mikesintillate. Used with permission.

Making your way back to Mallorca, you’ll travel along the southwestern coast to the tiny village of Portals Vells. You can moor here at the cove and swim, snorkel, and even hike in nearby caves. Made up of three secluded beaches with golden sand and shallow water, each has their own highlights and features. At the main beach of Sa Caleta, you’ll find yourself surrounded by gorgeous pine forests and rocky hills. Sunbeds, lounge chairs, and umbrellas are available for rent and there’s a cozy, local restaurant serving Mediterranean specialties. Just north is El Mago a smaller, nudist beach with soft, white sand and an onsite bar. The last beach is called Playa del Rei, which is the largest of the three and perfect for swimming. However, it also has some interesting features among the rocks, which make for some prime photo opportunities.

 

Seventh Day: Portals Vells to Port D’Andraitx - 8 nautical miles

  • Approximate Travel Time on a 12 Knot Motor Sailers, Gullets or (slow) Motor Yachts: 45 min
  • Approximate Travel Time on a 20 Knot (fast) Motor Yacht: 30 min

 

Port D'Andraitx. Photo by @mikesintillate. Used with permission.

End your yacht tour of Mallorca with a stop in the charming fishing village of Port D’Andraitx. One of Mallorca's classiest holiday destinations, it's remained a popular hotspot among celebrities and the yachting community. This pretty harbor has a modernized waterfront full of lively bars, restaurants, and cafes, but the marina’s yacht club, Club de Vela, has one of the best views in the area. At its onsite restaurant, you can enjoy a glass of sangria and some paella while gazing at the beautiful, yacht-filled port surrounded by rolling green hills. If your visit falls on a Sunday, you can also enjoy brunch at the Liedtke Museum, perched in a gorgeous villa overlooking the sea. Aside from having an art gallery, there’s also live music and film screenings here throughout the year.


Although you’ll say farewell to your luxury Balearics Islands yacht charter and her crew, there are plenty more adventures to be had! Book a similar trip or plan your next destination by making an inquiry on our website.